(Natural News)
Water is vital to your survival. In most disaster scenarios, people will die within three days if they don’t have access to clean drinking water.

Protect your family from dehydration when SHTF by stocking up on water, using sturdy water storage containers and knowing how to filter and purify from various sources. (h/t to PreppersWill.com)

A growing population and water availability

Water pollution is on the rise due to various causes, like pesticides and untreated human wastewater. Unfortunately, many groundwater sources are also becoming more contaminated because industrial chemicals continue to leach into underground aquifers.

High levels of pollution can make you sick right away and cause massive illness outbreaks. Their effects can also be long-lasting and go unnoticed for years, causing widespread and often irreparable damage to the environment and public health.

The human population has more than doubled in the last 50 years, increasing the strain on the planet’s resources due to industrialization and increased world hunger.

The global population has hit eight billion and more people are moving to cities, resulting in megacities that are now bigger than New York and London. This has also resulted in peri-urban slums where people live in close proximity to livestock.

Population growth in general and people’s land-use decisions have resulted in increased encroachment on open spaces and ecosystem disruption. Because humans often settle down near water sources, the world’s population growth has put a strain on its water basins, reducing availability of fresh water on Earth. (Related: Prepper storage guides: Which containers should you use to store water for stockpiling?)

This highlights the importance of setting up a water supply if you want to help your family survive when disaster strikes.

Agriculture and natural disasters

A shocking 70 percent of the world’s freshwater supply is used by agriculture, but at least 60 percent is wasted because of factors like ineffective water application methods, faulty irrigation systems and the cultivation of crops that require too much water in the wrong environments.

This then dries out the world’s rivers, lakes and underground aquifers. In turn, countries are at risk of running out of water resources.

While natural disasters don’t always result in long-term water scarcity, they still have a negative impact on communities in the short term, often causing increased disease transmission and pollution.

Hurricanes aren’t the only natural disaster that can cause a water crisis. For example, Haiti experienced one of the world’s worst earthquakes in 2010. The disaster claimed more than 92,000 lives.

Following the earthquake, a cholera outbreak linked to unsanitary water conditions killed almost 10,000 people. At least 890,000 Haitians were displaced because of the disaster, straining the already limited freshwater infrastructure.

The 2010 earthquake in Haiti proves that human migration and displacement exacerbate the scarcity of fresh water.

Stock up on freshwater for your personal and gardening needs

Don’t be like civilians who don’t prioritize storing fresh water in their survival stockpile. Even if there is no immediate and large-scale disaster, when SHTF you may face an event that causes subtle and gradual collateral damage.

You should also prepare for diverse disasters and water scarcity that can affect the area you live in. As preppers know, it’s better to plan ahead since you should already know what disasters may affect you based on where you live.

Stock up on enough water so you can deal with long-term power outages or other scenarios that are frequent in your state.

Water storage options for your supply

There are many ways to store water on your homestead depending on the space, your budget and your knowledge of storage and filtration principles.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people should drink at least one gallon of water per day. But if you actually track how much water you need for other tasks, like cleaning and hygiene, you will need more than a gallon of water each day.

You have various water storage considerations depending on where you live. If you live in a desert with no readily available water sources, you will have to store water differently than if you lived in a rural area with a nearby stream and options to filter that water.

You should also stock up on more water if you are living with children, the elderly, pregnant women and pets. Based on your needs analysis, you need at least two weeks’ worth of drinkable water.

Store clean water in water-specific containers, like buckets or bladders designed for water storage. Choose containers that are made of sturdy and quality food-grade materials.

Do not use containers that were previously used to store chemicals or other potentially harmful or unpleasant ingredients or odors.

Here are some food-grade options to consider for properly storing water:

Collapsible water containers

Collapsible water containers have a great storage capacity. They often come with a spigot and a handle.

However, the materials used in these containers are not as rigid as those used in more permanent water containers because they are collapsible. Most collapsible water containers can hold three to five gallons, but it’s better to avoid overfilling them because the increased pressure can cause them to rupture the longer they are kept in your stockpile.

Heavy-duty barrels

A 55-gallon blue barrel made of rigid, food-grade plastic can store enough water for one person for at least two months.

If you have a large family, you can either get more blue barrels or spend money on an upgraded version of a heavy-duty water container that can hold hundreds of gallons.

One downside to using these larger barrels is that once you decide on a storage location, it is almost impossible to move it once it’s filled with water.

Rain barrels

While some stored water is not safe to drink unless properly filtered and purified, water stored in containers like rain barrels is ideal for non-potable purposes like plant irrigation.

If you have a garden on your homestead and are worried about what to do with your plants during a water shortage, you can water them with collected rainwater in rain barrels.

Stackable water containers

Most stackable water containers are made of heavy-duty, dark plastic, usually color blue, and can be stacked on top of the other to maximize storage space.

The containers usually have a spigot and a handle to transport and dispense water and they can store five to seven gallons of water. The containers may cost $15 to $30 per piece.

When stacking these kinds of containers, avoid doing so excessively since overstacking can make the containers at the bottom crack under the weight.

Two-liter soda bottles

If you don’t have the budget for expensive storage containers, two-liter soda bottles are a cheap and readily available option.

If you live in the city or a small apartment, collect two-liter soda bottles. After thoroughly washing the bottles, fill them with water and store the bottles in a closet or food pantry.

Water “bladders”

Large water “bladders” like a waterBOB are best for home use if you have a bathtub or large sinks.

These bladders can hold a large amount of water and some products can even store up to 100 gallons of water. They may also come with siphoning kits.

Water bladders also have some disadvantages. Since they are almost as big as a bathtub, you won’t be able to use them unless you have more than one bathtub or shower.

Once filled, a water bladder is difficult to move since a full bathtub bladder can weigh over 100 pounds.

You can buy a heavy-duty water bladder that can be stored outside, but the material’s integrity might be jeopardized because of the heat or punctures.

Tips for long-term water storage

Once you decide on water storage options, keep these storage tips in mind:

Even if you’re not a prepper, long-term water storage is crucial to your survival when disaster strikes.

Go to Survival.news for more tips on how to build a survival stockpile before disaster strikes.

Watch the video below for more tips on efficient water storage.

This video is from the .

More related stories:

This content was originally published here.

Imagine the following scenario: an economic collapse has forced thousands of people outside of the cities throughout most of the world. Thousands of people without survival or tradable skills plague the countryside, and the number of gunfights one can hear about from their front porch is increasing. Those farms closer to the cities and main roads are forced to institute a 24/7 watch. Special taxes and ammunition scarcity add fuel to the fire.

Where you live is isolated, however, and there is nothing to be afraid of.

At least, so you think.

Getting in your diesel pickup, you drive a few minutes up to the place where the recent storm knocked down some old trees. They will be a good firewood source.

You start to cut the trees with the gasoline chainsaw. The chainsaw can get pretty loud, and to protect your ears, you’re wearing hearing protection. You don’t realize that three creepy-looking guys have surrounded you. One of them is halfway between you and your truck, where the shotgun is. The lookouts in the compound spotted them from a distance and tried to warn you some guys were roaming around, but the mobile radio was inside the truck, too, and the chainsaw noise masked the call.

It’s a nightmarish scenario. Don’t get caught in one of these.

You have to control your noise.

I know it’s almost impossible to be 100% silent in a compound. It’s just not going to happen, and we need to be realistic about our expectations. Tractors, generators, car engines, bike engines, ATV engines, snowmobile engines…everything with engines will make noise to a degree.

The last few days, we had severe power blackouts as many people were hit by the Caribbean storms. Heavy rain made some towers collapse. My family spent over 48 hours without power, other than my old car battery with two 13W solar charger.

The town was silent. The neighbor’s generator 300 meters (maybe more) away only lasted for one night. When I woke up the next day, there was not any noise. At all.

The silence in a world without electricity is impressive.

On a quiet night, in our mountain home, we can even listen to our closest neighbors, who live 150 meters away uphill. We could hear someone walking down the road, or even better, the dogs would catch it and start barking. Once the power goes out, something that happens fairly often during these windy, stormy months down here, the only entertainment we have is talking to each other.

Being simple countryside people, families here only light a couple of candles and keep on with their business as usual. They don’t care too much about the risks of being spotted. Not these days. Things are not as dangerous here as they once were, after all.

It’s funny, how even in the worst of the Argentinian crisis, we were actually fortunate that our garden was not producing as we had hoped it would. We mainly grew some coffee and limes. That was about it. I wonder what would have happened if our plants were productive amidst a famine. If we had chickens running everywhere, plenty of fruits on the trees, or some other valuable edibles, these may have been easily spotted.

Concealing your activities as much as you can when your nation collapses is the best idea. But when it involves noise, it’s hard.

I’ve been in some places where the level of productivity behind closed doors and high walls was outstanding. It’s almost a tradition nowadays in Venezuela to conceal businesses like workshops, car repair shops, and other businesses. Other countries would have these same shops out in the open. We’ve learned we can’t do that here.

Well, maybe this isn’t only something that Venezuela struggles with. I’ve noticed it’s standard practice in many other countries with a high crime rate.

Sound is associated with machines, and for a criminal, machines mean money these days.

Criminals like machines. These are things they can steal, disassemble, transport to some other place, reassemble, and sell to someone without too many questions. Sound means working people, maybe with cash in their pockets. Sound means a patron in charge, a great target forexpress kidnapping. The old style robbery of a mugging is not “in” these days. We now face the “new school” of crime.

Thieves now will take the family patron hostage and will “escort” him to empty his accounts, or, best case scenario, they will loot his entire business and home, leaving him and his family well tied up and alive for the next “harvesting” season.

Imagine what would happen in a world without the rule of law.

Eventually, people will learn the lesson and shoot an arrow, a stone, or whatever they can at someone trespassing. I know that many thugs send “scouts,” bold teenagers, to check who is there, what is on the property, and how many people, and will collect all the needed intel in ways that any military would do. And they will do it quietly.

If they get an attention call from the landowner, the theatrical play starts. With their best innocent, childish face, they will say, “Oh, we were just looking for some fallen fruit/vegetables…or were looking for our lost dog/cat/chicken/pig.”

They will then take all the information they have collected to the gang. Once the older ones have their guns cleaned, cocked and locked, they will also know how many people they will have to take care of at the target building. This happened in many haciendas here. It still happens. Owners, of anything, are vulnerable every day.

You have to understand the relationship between noise and distance.

Depending on the “pitch,” or how deep a sound is, the sound waves will travel further. This is why a bass drum’s noise will travel further than a triangle’s shrill note. Scientists have discovered that elephants generate infrasonic waves which are too “deep” of a sound for humans to hear, but they travel huge distances, allowing elephants to “talk” to other elephants. The features and traits of these extra-long sound waves allow them to reach such distances.

High-tone sounds do not travel as far, depending on ambient factors like humidity and others. You can read a good explanation of all this , which I recommend so you can measure your “noise comfort zone” in your compound (Check the links at the bottom of the article, too).

I know my place is secluded enough that you need to know where it is to find it, but with the (still-to-be-rebuilt) generator or the machinery in the still-to-be-installed-workshop running, it should not be hard to realize where it is once the world goes silent. That is the reason I am using  to get a noise reduction of up to 45 dB. It is not so hard to DIY it, and I highly suggest some prior testing so you can prepare your own “recipe.”

How do you make your weapons silent?

I am going to avoid giving any advice on the use of silent weapons other than the obvious. I am not qualified for this. I’m sorry if this is disappointing, but OPSEC is paramount down here. Even regular thugs have some degree of military training, and this is a globally increasing trend. Use this to your favor; a few cracked skulls without noticeable noise should make wonders to keep the marauders away if they are smart enough. If they are not, and they come back for revenge…Oh, well…

“A silent workshop? Yeah, right…”

An angle grinder or a disc cutter will make enough noise to be evident from many meters away if they are in the open. Usually, in a workshop, the noise will bounce around and will be more audible in some directions than in others. Always use ear protection: inner plugs and sound-dampening earphones. They’re a system that works together…and your hearing will be a crucial survival tool once SHTF!

The better advice would be to use some common sense. If you can soundproof your workshop on the cheap, do it without hesitation. Use some free time now before you have to do it in a rush after your nation is in the toilet. Cardboard egg trays covering the walls will dampen the sound a lot. They’re not pretty to look at, but they are very effective. Just paint it to make it look a bit better.

Air tools may be quieter, but there are some other considerations for long-term use, like the shelf life of the hoses. Modern air hoses, albeit rugged and durable, use chemicals to keep them flexible and airtight. However, I like to plan for the next 50/60 years. In my mind, my concern for future generations is the horizon I would like to cover. I would like that my grandson(s) and granddaughter(s) can say, “Jee. Grampa thought about a lot of things”.

(Want to know more about emergency evacuations? Check out our free QUICKSTART Guide.)

How do you silence a generator?

Let us elaborate a little bit on this. I am talking about liquid-fuel generators here. There are great electric ones out there, but I want to focus on what you likely have in your garage. One piece of advice from  is to install the generator far away from the dwelling quarters. No bueno.

You may need to get there in a rush for an emergency and check what is happening there without leaving your home. I already have the place for our generator. It’s not that far away (my cabin surroundings are not too extensive, maybe you saw it in my channel already). It will be in a housing dug out in the hillside, with the exhaust pointing straight up and enough space around for maintenance. I will have a direct view from my second floor. A good steel door will keep it safe.

Earth is an excellent sound dampener, also.

(Dirt is free, that is why it is my favorite!)

Remember that if you build a shelter for your generator, the sound will bounce into the walls and look for an exit. Usually, this sound escapes through the roof and/or the openings. If you build a cinder block shelter for your generator close to the main housing, fill the hollow space inside the cinder blocks with dirt. If you want to make it rocket-proof, use cement then, or cellular cement, which has even better soundproofing properties. This is kind of a waste unless you are waiting for a foreign power invasion but to each one their own. After 2020 and the way geopolitics is going…

Remember your generator housing will need ventilation to keep the generator running cool and allow venting of the fumes.

You may want to try before applying the cement, only stacking the cinder blocks and checking the gaps between each block to see what seems to work better to dampen the sound.

Not everything is a disadvantage. After a few months, your hearing will be so accustomed to silence that you will listen to the lowest of noises.

Use proper isolators for the skid of your generator!

Read the manual: every manufacturer will direct the owner to use rubber or wood as a platform for your generator. And if yours is portable, getting it on a frame and rubber wheels will make for a dual purpose.

If you are a DIY kind of guy, this will help: .

And PLEASE! be very careful with where you place your portable generator.

The fumes must be conducted away from your location. In my home, the most suitable place would be the front porch. However, my house is in a position where the air comes from this direction. Thus, I cannot drop the thing in there and start it. My backyard is enclosed, too, and airflow is somehow restricted. It’s all just a couple of meters wide, 7 meters long inside, like 2.5 meters high. I will have to run a pipe high enough so the fumes go over the wall and catch the winds coming from the front of the house. However, I have been working on this already and found a couple of solutions that you will see once it is in place.

If you are not a builder, then you may want to check the market for products like this: , a company I do not have any commercial relationship with.

(Want uninterrupted access to The Organic Prepper? Check out  .)

Bonus tip:

If there is plenty of silence around your compound, you could set up some noise/movement detectors should work for decades, be easy to repair, and are affordable. Again, for DIY people, check .

Some companies in the field are these:

Silence after SHTF is quite an extensive topic.

When the rest of the world is in silence, a compound with illumination, food, and noise, will be a target. Even worse, it is very likely that your neighbors will be the attackers. I have seen it happen. Building a soundproof basement with all the modern comforts, even a good sound system to listen to music or movies without the meth-heads ten blocks away finding out about it will surely pay for itself.

Keep safe, stay tuned, and tell us your tips in the comment section below. Is keeping the noise down something you have considered? Are there other purveyors of noise not mentioned in this article? Let’s discuss it.

About Jose

Jose is an upper middle class professional. He is a former worker of the oil state company with a Bachelor’s degree from one of the best national Universities. He has an old but in good shape SUV, a good 150 square meters house in a nice neighborhood, in a small but (formerly) prosperous city with two middle size malls. Jose is a prepper and shares his eyewitness accounts and survival stories from the collapse of his beloved Venezuela. Jose and his younger kid are currently back in Venezuela, after the intention of setting up a new life in another country didn’t  go well. The SARSCOV2 re-shaped the labor market and South American economy so he decided to give it a try to homestead in the mountains, and make a living as best as possible. But this time in his own land, and surrounded by family, friends and acquaintances, with all the gear and equipment collected, as the initial plan was.

 Follow Jose on YouTube and gain access to his exclusive content on PatreonDonations: paypal.me/JoseM151

The post The Importance of Silence After the SHTF appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

This content was originally published here.

If we are deep into some kind cataclysmic event and desperate people arrive at your door, what do you do? Your hard work, money, and family are all at play when people come a knockin! So, what is your gameplan? 

The simple answer is to say, “NO!” and not let anyone into your home. The truth is that things are a little more complicated than that. Also, there might be some value in the people you bring on board. You are going to need some help to get through tough times. 

Article continues below.

Just look at any natural disaster to see proof of that. 

In this article, we are going to look at what you should do when neighbors keep knocking. There are some things you should already have done if you are going to deal with people at your front door. 

Know Their Value 

Its easy to look at even family members as a burden on your supplies. The idea of taking more people in is often frowned upon by preppers. However, there is immense value in having people. People are eyes and ears, they are hearts and minds, and if they are family or friends, they could even have your best interest in mind! 

When I say “know their value,” I am not just talking about their survival skills. Instead, I am talking about their innate human value. 

If you plan on conducting any kind of security, then you are gonna need a bunch of people. It is unreasonable to assume that you can secure anything with yourself, your spouse, and two kids. Its just not possible. Now, if you have eight people, then you could make a difference. 

More hands for work is also another huge benefit. We will talk more about this later in the article.  

Can You Support Them?

I know you are prepper. I understand that you think yourself prepared for many things, and you assume that people will come to you for help. However, it is important to be honest with yourself about whether or not you can support anyone other than your family. 

Taking people in that you cannot support can be just as dangerous as telling people to leave. If they settle in and feel safe, then have the rug pulled out from under them again, they are going to get hostile.

So, understand where you are, truly, with your resources. Can you handle more people? How many calories do you have in total? How many resources do you have to spare? Know these things like the back of your hand and taking people, or not, will become much easier.

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Example: “We have 4 months’ worth of dry food for all of us. So, we need to start producing / hunting / trapping / trading for food NOW to be prepared in 4 months and to stretch our current stores.” 

Work Starts That Day 

Preparation is everything when it comes to taking in neighbors and family. I want you to develop a daily to-do list or work schedule for your home. You can develop that schedule today, even though many of the tasks could change in a grid down or TEOTWAWKI situation. 

Things like daily cooking, weeding, security, and waste management, and water collection may not be on your schedule now, but they will be if we have reached a point where essential services are all gone and the world around you has collapsed. 

Write these jobs out or create a simple schedule on Excel and leave the names empty. Get as many things on that schedule as you can think of, and leave some blank spaces to add tasks if you need to. Print out at least 52 of these for a years’ worth of schedules. 

When people show up for help or a place to live, one of the first things you should hand them is this list of duties. Assure them there is work to be done. Get them started on something right away and get their names on the schedule next certain tasks. 

I like the idea of letting them choose some tasks based on their skills. You could learn about them that way. There will be plenty to do and they should start DOING immediately upon arrival. 

Be CRYSTAL Clear About Rules 

What happens at your place when someone doesn’t get their daily work done? What happens if someone steals?

I don’t know the answer to this because only you and yours can establish that. You need to sit down and develop that rule set. It would be helpful to post these rules or put them on work schedules. This way there is no argument later. 

If someone has a job to do and decides they would rather walk the woods or sleep late, then it shouldn’t be up to you to explain the punishment. Instead, they should already know. 

Miss Work, Miss Dinner

Something as simple as that would suffice, or it could be more severe. You make the rules. Its your home. However, you must explain them very well and you also must be able to enforce those rules. Most people forget about enforcement when it comes to people who want to help.

You can always say NO, but can you make them go away? This doesn’t have to be a lethal approach, but your rule must have teeth. 

Who NEVER Comes In

The reason I focused so much on why you should bring people into your home is because we often forget about the value of humans in a collapse. We go to UBER isolation and that can be serious problem. We are weak when we are isolated. It just feels like we are safe because we are so far from the problems. But problems will come. 

That said, there are some people that you better never let into your home. There are people who have no business joining the ranks and will only cause you trouble. 

Addiction is always going to be the number one concern of the addicted. That means their family, your family, safety, food, water, security—all of it plays second fiddle to the addiction. Addicts are not people you want in your corner. If you love them, then you must come to terms with the fact that they will likely meet a dark end. 

Want to prep but not sure where to begin?
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You cannot afford to let addicts into your group, help them, tell them all about your system, storage and so on. They will sell you out. 

Violent Criminals

People with a criminal record or people with a questionable past might have their use in the SHTF world. However, that doesn’t mean their place should be in your home. These are not people that you want around you on a daily basis. Do not let them into your world.

Most people will not outright tell you they have a criminal past. However, if you are privy to that information then you should use it. 

Remember, violent criminals might not go away just because you tell them to. They might decide violence is a better option and go after you. So be prepared. 

Strangers With Kids

What happens if a total stranger happens upon your home, begging for help, and they have kids? We build something called refuge buckets. Into these we throw different grains and foods in small packages. These are going to be handed out to people with kids should they show up. Give them some food and a gallon of water and send them on their way. 

While it might feel good to bring in a mom and her children, there is no way of knowing their true intentions. What if they already belong to a much larger community and they are simply reconning you to go back home and tell the others what you have? You could be inviting trouble. 

We are living in a very divisive time. The people of this nation disagree on things, and we let it get between us. We let it shade our actions and how we build our society. It’s very dangerous. This is why so many people are talking about civil war. 

Depending on where you fall on the spectrum, you might have to consider the ideologies, religions, and beliefs of the people you bring into your home. Some of the issues of the day have gotten so extreme that people may struggle getting along together. 

Even if you do not like the idea of taking others in, you need to understand that YOU NEED OTHERS. You need to have some people around you. These people are going to be a key to the safety and longevity of your surviving party. 

Remember, it’s not as cut and dry as random people coming to the door. What if it is a good neighbor and their kids, cousins, siblings, or parents? Its not as simple as a resounding “NO” to all. 

Get your plan in place. Create your work schedule and make sure that everyone is pitching in. Having extra people around might prove to be the best thing that ever happened to you! 

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Preppers who live in the U.S. are very lucky because they have access to clean running water. But you will need more water when SHTF because it will eventually run out, even with careful rationing. (h/t to PreppersWill.com)

Technology has made it easier to forget crucial prepping skills

Even if you live in an area where many people have wells on their property, not everyone may know how to hand-dig a well.

There are many drilling tools available for your use, but when SHTF you might not have access to those tools, especially if you don’t have the fuel or electricity necessary to power them.

With picks, shovels and some elbow grease, you can dig a well on your homestead. Before SHTF, you can use this information to dig a well, so you have access to clean water. (Related: Water supply and prepping: A beginner’s guide to rainwater collection.)

Where to dig a well on your homestead

If you want to dig a well on your homestead, you can’t just dig a hole in the ground and hope that you locate water.

You need proper information to ensure that water will be found where you intend to dig. Study the land’s topography to get this crucial information.

Water flows downhill, including subsurface water. If you’re not sure where to dig, look for plants that require a steady supply of water.

If there is no visible surface water, the trees on your property may rely on groundwater to survive.

Similarly, a vanished brook or stream may have gone underground. Both of these regions are worth considering as potential well locations.

Tips for digging a well

Before you start digging, inspect the soil. What is the soil made of?

Is it mostly clay, gravel, sand, or rock and boulders?

Hand-excavated wells are often limited to soils that you can easily dig by hand. If there are a lot of large boulders, look for another location.

While a place full of rocks may be out of the question, you should also look for another location if the area contains soil that is very sandy since these types of soils can make your well collapse.

Now, how do you dig for water once you’ve decided to do so?

First, secure water for your household using only shovels, picks and other manual tools.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to dig a well. Plan for your well while you still have water in your stockpile so you don’t have the added stress of finding water because your supplies have already run out.

If the dirt is too dry, the hole for your well may collapse. The same thing might happen if it’s too wet. Worse, it may quickly fill with water while you are still digging into it.

Cave-ins are another thing to consider while digging a well. To avoid this, the sides of the hole should be strengthened using the right materials.

You can do this by gathering as many boards as you can before you begin excavating. It’s better to use longer boards.

You can also install special concrete sleeves in the hole. More sleeves added will help prevent cave-ins as you go deeper. If you don’t have access to concrete sleeves, you can make do with boards.

Alternatively, you can secure the hole with a metal or plastic culvert. If you can get culverts, these are a better option compared to boards. Culverts can also be left in the hole to serve as the well’s liner.

When choosing the location for your well, avoid septic systems or areas where there have been outhouses or latrines in recent times. The odds of contamination are higher close to septic fields or any area previously used for human waste.

Digging too close can mean that you get water that is high in fecal coliform and can make you very sick.

To start digging a well, measure a circle at least five feet in diameter. Begin digging with your shovel and pick and make sure you dig evenly around the full circle.

After digging a few feet, begin lining the hole with boards. Insert them vertically or place the first length of the culvert.

Make sure the boards are close fitting and use cross members to keep the boards tight against the hole’s sides. As you dig deeper, keep hammering the boards down. This may be time-consuming, but these additional steps will help protect you from cave-ins.

Hand-dug wells are often shallow, ranging in depth from five to 65 feet. To dig a well that deep will require a lot of effort and energy that you might not be able to afford in a survival scenario. Calculate the risks and the rewards before starting a labor-intensive activity like digging a well.

If you want to get the well done faster, you can ask your neighbors to help you dig the well and share it with them.

Before you start digging, make sure you also have a reliable path out of the well’s hole. If and when you hit water, the hole might quickly fill up so a ladder will help you get out alive.

You already have the material to line the well hole if you’re using a metal or plastic culvert. If not, you can line the sides of the well with masonry or stones. This will help stabilize the well and avoid further cave-ins.

Backfill the gap between the liner and the walls with crushed stone, gravel or tiny rocks once the well is established. This will help keep silt out of the well water.

Cap the well to prevent objects from falling into it and contaminating the water.

When SHTF, a working well may be your only source of drinking water. Choose the right spot on your homestead to dig a well, so you have access to clean water when disaster strikes.

Visit Preparedness.news for more tips on how to prepare before SHTF.

Watch this video to learn about 10 ways to clean drinking water after a disaster.

This video is from the .

Sources include:

The post How to Dig a Well to Secure Your Water Supply Before SHTF appeared first on NOQ Report – Conservative Christian News, Opinions, and Quotes.

This content was originally published here.

Long-distance travel could become extremely difficult and dangerous in a SHTF scenario. Food, fuel and other essentials would be scarce. Traffic laws would no longer apply. Thieves and other unsavory characters would stalk the major roadways and target vulnerable travelers.

Here are the top 10 need-to-know tips to prepare for these threats if a SHTF scenario occurs.

1.    Stock up on Food and Fuel

The mark of a true survivalist is a hidden bunker or supply room full of water containers, nonperishable food and other essential survival items you might need. Stocking up on precious supplies is the first and most important step in preparing for any SHTF scenario.

When it comes to fuel, you can start by keeping your car’s gas tank full with frequent top-offs.

Buy some spare gas cans and fill one with extra fuel every few weeks. Gasoline can last up to six months in storage, so you should be able to put together a healthy supply. Clearly label each can to ensure you refill your vehicle with the oldest gas and don’t waste the freshest gas.

People like to think SHTF scenarios are highly unlikely, but fuel scarcity is starting to look like a real possibility in Europe and the U.S. A gas shortage could impact your community in the coming months. While angry mobs of unprepared citizens pile up at gas stations, you’ll already be leaving town for a safer place thanks to your personal fuel supply.

You might also consider growing your own food with small livestock or a vegetable garden. Supply chains will collapse, fresh food deliveries will disappear and grocery stores will get picked clean in a matter of weeks during a SHTF scenario. Having your own sustenance could mean the difference between life and death if you need to travel a long distance.

2.    Pack an Emergency Travel Bag

The key to surviving any community emergency is to leave the area ASAP. You can’t afford to lollygag. That’s why you need to pack an emergency travel bag so you can skip town quickly. Your bag should contain food, water, extra clothes, navigation tools and a weapon for self-defense. Keep it in the trunk of your car at all times.

You might not be at home when disaster strikes, so leaving all your belongings in one place doesn’t make sense. An emergency bag enables you to leave the area without stopping at home. You can pick up your loved ones and get out of dodge before traffic jams start to form. Your number of supplies might be limited, but it’s better than nothing.

3.    Stock Your Car With Emergency Items

Along with packing an emergency bag, you should stock your car with other items for safety, maintenance and other miscellaneous tasks. If your home and neighborhood become dangerous, your vehicle is the next best option for consistent shelter and protection. Ensure you keep these items in your car:

These items will help turn your vehicle into a portable shelter. You have all the necessary tools to administer first aid, make minor car repairs and refuel to continue your journey. There’s no guarantee that an ambulance or roadside assistance service will help you during a widespread disaster, so you must look after yourself.

4.    Find a Vehicle With Good Mileage

Cars with mechanical problems and substandard mileage won’t last long in a SHTF scenario. If you’re not confident in your current vehicle, you need to make an upgrade. Smaller sedans from manufacturers such as Toyota, Ford, Subaru and Honda usually have the best mileage. Some models even reach over 50 mpg on highways.

A hybrid electric vehicle would also be a viable option in this situation. For example, the Mustang Mach-E can drive up to 300 miles on a single charge. Hybrids also give you two power sources, which would be extremely convenient during a fuel crisis. You can rely on the car’s electric power — while the power grid is still up, anyway — and save your fuel for later.

5.    Be a Fuel-Efficient Driver

Wasteful driving habits like idling and speeding will cost you precious gas in a SHTF scenario. You must work on being a fuel-efficient driver while things are still good. Keep these smart habits in mind:

These tips also apply to EVs, but EV owners also need to pay close attention to the weather. Batteries do not like cold weather, and their maximum range will plummet if you put them through harsh elements too often.

6.    Invest in Car Security Features

Your car becomes your primary shelter during long-distance travel. You must protect it with security features just as you would your house. These security tools would make your journeys much safer:

You might think your vehicle is safe from thieves now, but that can change overnight. Your neighbors could become immediate threats in a survival situation. Security is a nonnegotiable step in preparing for travel in a SHTF scenario.

7.    Find a Reliable Safe Haven

Most people have a safe haven in mind if they need to evacuate town, such as a nearby hotel or family member’s house. However, these places might not be available in a widespread SHTF scenario. You must build or find another more secure location that won’t be immediately compromised in a nationwide emergency.

A military base would be your best bet if you can’t build a secret shelter somewhere. These places are well-stocked with provisions, weapons and trained public servants and could become popular safe havens for desperate travelers. Make sure you know the directions to the nearest ones.

8.    Map Out Multiple Routes

If you’ve seen or read the popular apocalyptic story “The Walking Dead,” you know traffic jams can be death sentences for travelers. With thousands of people leaving town at the same time, you can be sure that the main roadways will pile up within a few hours. Hysteria will ensue, and violence will inevitably break out.

That’s why you must map out multiple routes to ensure you don’t get trapped. Taking quieter backstreets is safer than relying on highways anyway. People looking to profit from the chaos will be stalking major roadways for stragglers. You might burn through fuel more quickly, but your safety is vital.

9.    Choose Rest Stops Wisely

You must also choose your rest stops wisely. Gas stations and highway rest areas might not be safe in a SHTF scenario, especially if you’re carrying extra fuel and other precious supplies. You would be a high-priority target for thieves and scavengers. It’s always best to keep a low profile while traveling in an emergency.

When you need to stop to eat, refuel or use the bathroom, drive to a hidden area out of sight and earshot of the road. If you need to spend the night in your vehicle, look for places with natural cover, such as trees and boulders. You don’t want to go too far away from the road, though. You might have to make a quick getaway if you encounter dangerous strangers.

10.  Keep Passengers Occupied

All these survival preparations boil down to one purpose: preventing panic. Panic leads to poor decisions, which can result in injuries or death. However, just because you’re calm in the face of disaster doesn’t mean your fellow travelers are. You must keep your passengers occupied to prevent panic from overtaking the group.

Provide everyone with meaningful tasks they can do to keep their minds off the present situation. Give children books, board games, puzzles and other distractions. Everyone should have something to do. This sense of purpose keeps your companions in the right state of mind and helps you focus on driving them to safety.

Be Prepared for Anything

Most of the global population isn’t prepared for a SHTF scenario. Only a small fraction of people have the supplies, skills and wherewithal to survive. Will you stay with the unprepared masses, or will you take steps to keep yourself and your family safe?

In this volatile world, you must be prepared for anything. Your vehicle is one of your most valuable assets, so you must take good care of it and stock it with the necessary provisions. These precautions will make your travels safer if and when the time comes.

This content was originally published here.

(Natural News)
Preppers who live in the U.S. are very lucky because they have access to clean running water. But you will need more water when SHTF because it will eventually run out, even with careful rationing. (h/t to PreppersWill.com)

Technology has made it easier to forget crucial prepping skills

Even if you live in an area where many people have wells on their property, not everyone may know how to hand-dig a well.

There are many drilling tools available for your use, but when SHTF you might not have access to those tools, especially if you don’t have the fuel or electricity necessary to power them.

With picks, shovels and some elbow grease, you can dig a well on your homestead. Before SHTF, you can use this information to dig a well, so you have access to clean water. (Related: Water supply and prepping: A beginner’s guide to rainwater collection.)

Where to dig a well on your homestead

If you want to dig a well on your homestead, you can’t just dig a hole in the ground and hope that you locate water.

You need proper information to ensure that water will be found where you intend to dig. Study the land’s topography to get this crucial information.

Water flows downhill, including subsurface water. If you’re not sure where to dig, look for plants that require a steady supply of water.

If there is no visible surface water, the trees on your property may rely on groundwater to survive.

Similarly, a vanished brook or stream may have gone underground. Both of these regions are worth considering as potential well locations.

Tips for digging a well

Before you start digging, inspect the soil. What is the soil made of?

Is it mostly clay, gravel, sand, or rock and boulders?

Hand-excavated wells are often limited to soils that you can easily dig by hand. If there are a lot of large boulders, look for another location.

While a place full of rocks may be out of the question, you should also look for another location if the area contains soil that is very sandy since these types of soils can make your well collapse.

Now, how do you dig for water once you’ve decided to do so?

First, secure water for your household using only shovels, picks and other manual tools.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to dig a well. Plan for your well while you still have water in your stockpile so you don’t have the added stress of finding water because your supplies have already run out.

If the dirt is too dry, the hole for your well may collapse. The same thing might happen if it’s too wet. Worse, it may quickly fill with water while you are still digging into it.

Cave-ins are another thing to consider while digging a well. To avoid this, the sides of the hole should be strengthened using the right materials.

You can do this by gathering as many boards as you can before you begin excavating. It’s better to use longer boards.

You can also install special concrete sleeves in the hole. More sleeves added will help prevent cave-ins as you go deeper. If you don’t have access to concrete sleeves, you can make do with boards.

Alternatively, you can secure the hole with a metal or plastic culvert. If you can get culverts, these are a better option compared to boards. Culverts can also be left in the hole to serve as the well’s liner.

When choosing the location for your well, avoid septic systems or areas where there have been outhouses or latrines in recent times. The odds of contamination are higher close to septic fields or any area previously used for human waste.

Digging too close can mean that you get water that is high in fecal coliform and can make you very sick.

To start digging a well, measure a circle at least five feet in diameter. Begin digging with your shovel and pick and make sure you dig evenly around the full circle.

After digging a few feet, begin lining the hole with boards. Insert them vertically or place the first length of the culvert.

Make sure the boards are close fitting and use cross members to keep the boards tight against the hole’s sides. As you dig deeper, keep hammering the boards down. This may be time-consuming, but these additional steps will help protect you from cave-ins.

Hand-dug wells are often shallow, ranging in depth from five to 65 feet. To dig a well that deep will require a lot of effort and energy that you might not be able to afford in a survival scenario. Calculate the risks and the rewards before starting a labor-intensive activity like digging a well.

If you want to get the well done faster, you can ask your neighbors to help you dig the well and share it with them.

Before you start digging, make sure you also have a reliable path out of the well’s hole. If and when you hit water, the hole might quickly fill up so a ladder will help you get out alive.

You already have the material to line the well hole if you’re using a metal or plastic culvert. If not, you can line the sides of the well with masonry or stones. This will help stabilize the well and avoid further cave-ins.

Backfill the gap between the liner and the walls with crushed stone, gravel or tiny rocks once the well is established. This will help keep silt out of the well water.

Cap the well to prevent objects from falling into it and contaminating the water.

When SHTF, a working well may be your only source of drinking water. Choose the right spot on your homestead to dig a well, so you have access to clean water when disaster strikes.

Visit Preparedness.news for more tips on how to prepare before SHTF.

Watch the video below to learn about 10 ways to clean drinking water after a disaster.

This video is from the .

More related stories:

This content was originally published here.

If you have ever gone camping, you’ve probably aware that there are many basic survival skills needed for outdoor living, such as learning how to start a fire, collect water, cook camping meals, build a campsite, dig a latrine, or catch a fish. Those survival skills will come in handy, especially if a SHTF (Sh!t Hits The Fan) scenario occurs. But is long-term camping a realistic option in a SHTF scenario?

Where would you go if you had to leave your home for a natural disaster, wildfire, impending war, or chemical spill? Depending on the circumstances, it could be dangerous to stay in your house. It’s common for preppers to consider evacuating to a remote location in the wilderness if they own a decent tent, an RV, or a trailer.

Is it realistic to prepare for a SHTF scenario by thinking you’ll rough it in the woods and adapt to living off the land? Long-term camping takes a lot of practice and planning.

Long-Term Camping and How it Relates to Prepping

Camping — some love it, others hate it. Perhaps you’ve never camped out overnight or just returned from a long weekend camping trip. Whether it’s solo, on a family trip, or on a corporate retreat, camping is an excellent opportunity to visit a new area, connect with nature and take a break from all of life’s distractions.

Most people camp for several days, which is about when the ice melts in the cooler, before returning home to resume their daily routines. It’s less common for people to camp for weeks, but it can vary from person to person.

When you go long-term camping, you often need a four-season tent, camping trailer, or RV for shelter. Extensive food, water filter, and other supplies are also needed. Many long-term campers also invest in some type of power supply, such as a portable generator.

Most of the activities involved in long-term camping overlap with preppers that plan for a worst-case scenario. You need shelter, food, water, power, survival supplies, and a safe spot. So since preppers have most of the essential gear, is long-term camping a realistic plan?

Reasons Why Long-Term Camping in the Woods Might be Unrealistic if SHTF

Bugging out to the woods might sound ideal in a perfect world, but there are some reasons why it might not be feasible for every prepper. Here are some points to consider that could make long-term camping unrealistic:

  • Depending on where you live, you will have to purchase remote land or move your campsite every 14 days, depending on state and federal laws.
  • Even if you have decent survival skills, indefinite camping might prove too challenging for you, your partner, or your family members.
  • Managing a group of long-term campers can dwindle your survival supplies quickly.
  • Woodland camping can put you and your family in dangerous situations with little or no protection.
  • Anyone with health challenges dependent on medications would not have access to doctors, pharmacies, or hospitals.
  • Roads may be closed, which leads to your planned long-term camping destination in a SHTF scenario.
  • Harsh weather conditions can make it much harder to survive in the woods indefinitely.

Because every prepper is different, these points may or may not apply to you. However, some world events could change your circumstances and force you to choose if long-term camping is the only option.

For example, after Russia invaded Ukraine in February, many Ukrainian citizens fled cities under siege, creating the largest mass movement of people in Europe since World War II. Over 6 million Ukrainians are homeless. Camping supplies are essential as they take shelter in sporting arenas, train stations, or makeshift shelters.  

Essential Gear for Long-Term Camping

Since long-term camping is different from short-lived camping trips, you’ll need to purchase the right gear. Here are some essential things you need for long-term camping:

  • Appropriate clothing for changes in the seasons
  • A GPS or compass
  • Heating and cooking resources
  • Medical kits and prescriptions
  • Personal hygiene supplies
  • Off-grid lighting and a power source
  • Fishing, hunting, and trapping gear

Should you consider becoming a long-term camper?

Before choosing long-term camping, you should consider the pros and cons. If you’re an experienced camper, you might already know the pros and cons. But if you’re a prepper with little or no camping experience, continue reading to learn if it’s right for you and your family.

Pros

  • Allows you to live a minimalist lifestyle
  • The ability to move your shelter to a desired location
  • It can teach you valuable survival skills
  • Once you have camping gear, it can be used in emergency situations

Cons

  • Become subject to unpredictable weather conditions
  • Animals become less fearful and could put you and your family in danger
  • Other campers might find your location and have malicious intentions
  • It could be challenging to find help if someone is seriously sick or injured
  • Food, fuel, and water supplies could run low
  • You might get tired of the camping lifestyle

Long-Term Camping Puts Your Survival Skills to the Test

When you think about a SHTF scenario, you might consider staying in your home because it’s the safest option. While this may be true, evacuating your home and taking a long-term camping trip might be a safer option. Although it does require more preparation than a standard camping trip, it’s better to be safe than sorry in a SHTF situation. Making a plan and practicing before the unexpected happens can make long-term camping a potential, realistic option for you and your family if things go awry.

Thanks for visiting Preppers Survive. Before you leave subscribe to our newsletter. If you enjoyed this article is Long-Term Camping a Realistic Option, please share it on your favorite social media.

The post Is Long-Term Camping a Realistic Option in a SHTF Scenario? appeared first on Survival Prepper.

This content was originally published here.

This article was originally published by Martin Banks on www.survivopedia.com

The world has had many near-SHTF scenarios in the last few years, including a global pandemic, a spike in natural disasters and a widespread economic recession.

With gas prices reaching record highs, fuel scarcity is yet another potential problem you must prepare for. Here are 10 strategies for dealing with it if things continue to go south.

1.    Practice Fuel-Efficient Driving Habits

How you drive your vehicle has a significant impact on its fuel consumption. If a gas crisis emerges, you can’t afford to continue wasteful habits like idling and speeding. Start practicing these fuel-efficient driving habits now so you’ll be prepared if SHTF:

You should also determine the most optimal route each time you drive. This strategy is more complicated than you think, because the fastest way isn’t always the best.

For example, going through the city might be the quickest way to get from point A to point B, but the constant starts and stops burn more fuel. A trip through the suburbs may take longer, but it consumes less gas because driving at a consistent speed puts less strain on the vehicle.

2.    Use Other Transportation Methods

Start using other transportation methods to get around your local area. Use public transportation, hail a ride-sharing service, take a bicycle or simply walk. Anything that doesn’t take precious fuel from your limited supply is a worthwhile alternative. Your daily commute is a good place to start, as it makes up a large portion of your collective consumption.

You should also discuss carpooling with your co-workers so everyone can save gas on their daily commutes. A group of people can only hope to survive a SHTF scenario through communication and collaboration.

If your job is flexible enough, you might even be able to switch to a remote work position and eliminate your daily commute altogether. This one change will save you dozens of gallons of fuel in the long run.

3.    Stay Proactive With Vehicle Maintenance

You need to stay proactive with maintenance for your car to remain as fuel-efficient as possible. That means you must spend more time on preventive maintenance tasks such as checking the tire pressure, changing the filters and replacing the fluids based on the manufacturer’s recommendations.

You also can’t afford to ignore minor car problems or they might lead to a serious mechanical failure. The last thing you want during a SHTF scenario is an unexpected breakdown. Learn to troubleshoot common engine problems so your car stays healthy and reliable.

The sky-high gas prices are one indicator of a possible SHTF fuel crisis, but we still don’t know when it might occur. It could happen in a few years or tomorrow. The best option is to prepare for the worst and keep your gas tanks full with frequent top-offs.

You should also fill up your spare gas cans with at least three months’ worth of fuel, as gasoline has a shelf life of up to six months. Label each tank by date so you can fill up your vehicles with the oldest can.

If and when fuel becomes scarce, all your essential vehicles and tools will have a healthy fuel supply. While everyone else is fighting each other at gas stations, you will be sitting at home thanking yourself for having the foresight to maintain your stockpile. However, you still have to use it wisely.

5.    Track Your Fuel Consumption

Tracking your fuel consumption will be crucial to making your supply last. Three essential tasks will ensure accurate tracking: recording your miles driven, logging each refill and communicating with your loved ones. You can’t afford to casually take from your limited supply in a crisis. Tracking helps you devote every gallon to something worthwhile, such as driving for more supplies or heating your home. You won’t want to waste a single drop.

6.    Bolster Your Home and Auto Security

In a SHTF scenario, the people with the most resources have the brightest targets on their backs. You can be sure people will try to siphon gas from you, especially if they know you have a full tank and a stockpile hidden on your property. They might even be desperate enough to steal your vehicle and other essential supplies while they’re at it.

You must bolster your house and vehicle security to protect your hard-earned supply. Your home system should include cameras, light fixtures and motion-sensor alarms to ward off trespassers. These auto security devices would make great additions to your vehicles:

Even if you live in a safe crime-free community now, there’s no guarantee it will remain so in a fuel crisis. Your next-door neighbor might become a threat. Security is one of the greatest investments you can make to prepare for a SHTF scenario.

Petroleum-based fuel shouldn’t be your only option. After all, we use gas for more than just driving. It’s essential for generating electricity, cooking food and heating homes. You need to start investing in multiple emergency fuel sources to increase your supply as much as possible. Start stockpiling these materials:

These alternative fuel sources are more widely available than gasoline, so you should start using them for daily tasks more often. Every drop of gas will be precious once SHTF, so you might as well become an expert with these other options now.

8.    Use Alternative Energy Sources

You shouldn’t rely 100% on a singular energy source. These alternative options are becoming more common on off-grid homesteads worldwide:

Based on these brief descriptions, solar energy is clearly the easiest to implement for most people. However, every home has different needs. Wind or hydroelectric energy might be the most practical option for your climate and location. Evaluate your property and start laying the groundwork to install one of these systems.

9.    Stock up on Essential Goods

Following all these strategies means you’ve done everything you can to prepare for a fuel shortage. What now? In a SHTF scenario, you need to prepare for everything. You can’t call yourself a true survivalist if you don’t have a shelf or bunker full of food, water, first-aid supplies and other essential survival items. Start stocking up now because a crisis can start in the blink of an eye.

10.  Grow Your Own Food

The ability to grow your own food will be a major advantage if a fuel scarcity situation occurs. Trucks won’t be able to deliver fresh food, supply chains will shut down and grocery stores will have slim pickings. The only person you can rely on is yourself.

You don’t need much space to start a vegetable garden, and small livestock like chickens and pigs are fantastic resources for homesteads with limited square footage. Live off the land to stay fed and healthy in a desperate situation.

Survival of the Fittest

Many of us have the privilege of living in comfort, but a fuel crisis can take that away. Given the current state of the oil market and the global economy, a SHTF scenario doesn’t seem so farfetched. If such a situation occurs, it will be survival of the fittest.

Don’t let yourself get too comfortable. Apply these 10 tips to your survival checklist so you and your loved ones are prepared for fuel scarcity and all the problems it can bring.

Other Survival Solutions(This are the most reliable survival books that you can find)

This content was originally published here.

The world has had many near-SHTF scenarios in the last few years, including a global pandemic, a spike in natural disasters and a widespread economic recession.

With gas prices reaching record highs, fuel scarcity is yet another potential problem you must prepare for. Here are 10 strategies for dealing with it if things continue to go south.

1.    Practice Fuel-Efficient Driving Habits

How you drive your vehicle has a significant impact on its fuel consumption. If a gas crisis emerges, you can’t afford to continue wasteful habits like idling and speeding. Start practicing these fuel-efficient driving habits now so you’ll be prepared if SHTF:

You should also determine the most optimal route each time you drive. This strategy is more complicated than you think, because the fastest way isn’t always the best.

For example, going through the city might be the quickest way to get from point A to point B, but the constant starts and stops burn more fuel. A trip through the suburbs may take longer, but it consumes less gas because driving at a consistent speed puts less strain on the vehicle.

2.    Use Other Transportation Methods

Start using other transportation methods to get around your local area. Use public transportation, hail a ride-sharing service, take a bicycle or simply walk. Anything that doesn’t take precious fuel from your limited supply is a worthwhile alternative. Your daily commute is a good place to start, as it makes up a large portion of your collective consumption.

You should also discuss carpooling with your co-workers so everyone can save gas on their daily commutes. A group of people can only hope to survive a SHTF scenario through communication and collaboration.

If your job is flexible enough, you might even be able to switch to a remote work position and eliminate your daily commute altogether. This one change will save you dozens of gallons of fuel in the long run.

3.    Stay Proactive With Vehicle Maintenance

You need to stay proactive with maintenance for your car to remain as fuel-efficient as possible. That means you must spend more time on preventive maintenance tasks such as checking the tire pressure, changing the filters and replacing the fluids based on the manufacturer’s recommendations.

You also can’t afford to ignore minor car problems or they might lead to a serious mechanical failure. The last thing you want during a SHTF scenario is an unexpected breakdown. Learn to troubleshoot common engine problems so your car stays healthy and reliable.

The sky-high gas prices are one indicator of a possible SHTF fuel crisis, but we still don’t know when it might occur. It could happen in a few years or tomorrow. The best option is to prepare for the worst and keep your gas tanks full with frequent top-offs.

You should also fill up your spare gas cans with at least three months’ worth of fuel, as gasoline has a shelf life of up to six months. Label each tank by date so you can fill up your vehicles with the oldest can.

If and when fuel becomes scarce, all your essential vehicles and tools will have a healthy fuel supply. While everyone else is fighting each other at gas stations, you will be sitting at home thanking yourself for having the foresight to maintain your stockpile. However, you still have to use it wisely.

5.    Track Your Fuel Consumption

Tracking your fuel consumption will be crucial to making your supply last. Three essential tasks will ensure accurate tracking: recording your miles driven, logging each refill and communicating with your loved ones. You can’t afford to casually take from your limited supply in a crisis. Tracking helps you devote every gallon to something worthwhile, such as driving for more supplies or heating your home. You won’t want to waste a single drop.

6.    Bolster Your Home and Auto Security

In a SHTF scenario, the people with the most resources have the brightest targets on their backs. You can be sure people will try to siphon gas from you, especially if they know you have a full tank and a stockpile hidden on your property. They might even be desperate enough to steal your vehicle and other essential supplies while they’re at it.

You must bolster your house and vehicle security to protect your hard-earned supply. Your home system should include cameras, light fixtures and motion-sensor alarms to ward off trespassers. These auto security devices would make great additions to your vehicles:

Even if you live in a safe crime-free community now, there’s no guarantee it will remain so in a fuel crisis. Your next-door neighbor might become a threat. Security is one of the greatest investments you can make to prepare for a SHTF scenario.

7.    Invest in Emergency Fuel Sources

Petroleum-based fuel shouldn’t be your only option. After all, we use gas for more than just driving. It’s essential for generating electricity, cooking food and heating homes. You need to start investing in multiple emergency fuel sources to increase your supply as much as possible. Start stockpiling these materials:

These alternative fuel sources are more widely available than gasoline, so you should start using them for daily tasks more often. Every drop of gas will be precious once SHTF, so you might as well become an expert with these other options now.

8.    Use Alternative Energy Sources

You shouldn’t rely 100% on a singular energy source. These alternative options are becoming more common on off-grid homesteads worldwide:

Based on these brief descriptions, solar energy is clearly the easiest to implement for most people. However, every home has different needs. Wind or hydroelectric energy might be the most practical option for your climate and location. Evaluate your property and start laying the groundwork to install one of these systems.

9.    Stock up on Essential Goods

Following all these strategies means you’ve done everything you can to prepare for a fuel shortage. What now? In a SHTF scenario, you need to prepare for everything. You can’t call yourself a true survivalist if you don’t have a shelf or bunker full of food, water, first-aid supplies and other essential survival items. Start stocking up now because a crisis can start in the blink of an eye.

10.  Grow Your Own Food

The ability to grow your own food will be a major advantage if a fuel scarcity situation occurs. Trucks won’t be able to deliver fresh food, supply chains will shut down and grocery stores will have slim pickings. The only person you can rely on is yourself.

You don’t need much space to start a vegetable garden, and small livestock like chickens and pigs are fantastic resources for homesteads with limited square footage. Live off the land to stay fed and healthy in a desperate situation.

Survival of the Fittest

Many of us have the privilege of living in comfort, but a fuel crisis can take that away. Given the current state of the oil market and the global economy, a SHTF scenario doesn’t seem so farfetched. If such a situation occurs, it will be survival of the fittest.

Don’t let yourself get too comfortable. Apply these 10 tips to your survival checklist so you and your loved ones are prepared for fuel scarcity and all the problems it can bring.

This content was originally published here.

(Natural News)
You need to be prepared for global disasters like pandemics, supply chain problems or the possibility of a nuclear war.

If parts or all of the power grid goes down, do you have a way of getting in touch with your loved ones? If the answer is no, it’s time to invest in a low-, medium, or high-tech method of communication like a signal mirror, walkie-talkies or a ham radio. (h/t to HomesteadSurvivalsite.com)

During a large-scale disaster, you might not be able to get updates by turning on the TV or radio for news or checking your phone to see what is happening. After SHTF, communication will be vital so you can find out what is happening in your community.

People have been communicating with each other for many years even without a centralized power system. The methods detailed below may seem old and outdated, but many of them will come back to the forefront after SHTF.

Here are 11 ways to communicate after the grid goes down.

High-tech comms options

These methods of communication require some kind of prior knowledge, licensing or money to purchase and use when disaster strikes.

CB radios

The Citizens Band Radio Service or CB radio is a great option for communicating locally within your area. A CB radio doesn’t require a special license to own and operate, but there are some rules that you should be aware of.

A CB radio has 40 shared channels that are lower powered than other radio options. You can only communicate within 155.3 miles away from your location, but some signals may skip longer distances due to the ionosphere.

When selecting a CB radio for your homestead, invest in a high-quality antenna that will help improve your reach. You can buy a mobile professional-grade CB radio for your vehicle for about $120 or get a handheld option for about $100.

Mobile CB radios are powered using the battery in the vehicle, or you can purchase some adapters that will let you tap into the car’s power system.

Home-based CB radios can be powered using a base unit battery or a 12-volt power supply. Another option is to get solar-powered chargers for continuous power when the grid is down.

Compact satellite communicator

If you prefer high-tech communication methods, consider getting a compact satellite communicator like the Garmin inReach Mini.

This device has two-way communication options and tracking, as well as SOS capabilities in case of an accident. The Bivy Stick (SAT123.c0m, a sponsor of Brighteon) sends text messages via satellite, which may be helpful when the power grid is down in your area but not globally.

Some devices like the Garmin inReach Mini are more expensive at $350, and it also requires a monthly subscription. There is a limit on how many text messages you can send. The device’s lithium-ion battery can last up to 14 days in default mode. (Related: Survival essentials: How to communicate after TEOTWAWKI.)

Ham radios

Amateur radio or ham radio is a great way to communicate with others after SHTF.

Ham radios allow operators to talk with people worldwide without the need for smartphones or the internet. Note that due to their distance abilities, ham radio operators need a license to operate a station officially.

The FCC regulates the radio frequencies used by ham radio operators called Amateur Bands. Ham radios are crucial because they have been used to assist others and in emergency services after disasters have shut down the usual communication methods.

The license costs about $40, and you are required to take a test to get your license. After receiving a license, you will spend at least $200 to get a ham radio.

There are six types of licensing classes that will help you grow your skills and abilities with the ham radio. A ham radio is powered with a 12-volt DC, power bank or solar power with the right equipment.

Many preppers and homesteaders prefer to use a ham radio as a communication method because it is more powerful and can reach people worldwide.

Satellite phones

When the grid goes down after SHTF, you might not be able to use your smartphone to communicate. This is where a satellite phone may come in handy since cell phones need cell towers that rely on electricity to receive and relay signals between phones.

Meanwhile, satellite phones or sat phones bounce signals off orbiting satellites instead of cell towers on land. The communication satellites are constantly spinning around the Earth in either High Earth Orbit or Low Earth Orbit.

However, satellite phones are expensive and may cost around $600 to $2,000 each. Additionally, sat phones have a per-minute fee and monthly service fee.

Sat phones are charged with a battery. You can buy a solar charger for them to make it easy to keep the phone ready for use after SHTF.

Medium-tech comms options

These communication tools require some power, but are also very user-friendly and rather easy to master.

Emergency radio

A handheld emergency radio with a hand crank is small enough to pack but can connect you to local radio channels in your area for information after a disaster.

A radio can’t send communication, but it will help you stay updated. If you have a hand crank radio, you can power the radio with elbow grease if the power goes out.

Morse code

Morse code may seem outdated, but knowing and understanding Morse code could save your life if you are dealing with a survival scenario.

Morse code is a system of dots and dashes that equal a specific letter of the alphabet. These dots and dashes are used together to spell words that don’t require verbal communication.

Morse code is usually transmitted via electrical signals, but the code can also be used in non-audible forms of communication. You can use Morse code with a light, or any tool that can quickly be turned on and off or opened and closed like a flashlight or a bright room with window blinds.

Before SHTF, memorize the code and practice with others to build your skills and keep this form of emergency communication handy.

Walkie-talkies

Walkie-talkies are considered outdated, but they are a great option for communicating without a power grid. A good walkie-talkie model can be used to communicate with others about 30 miles away, making it an essential part of getting local information.

Walkie-talkies don’t require any kind of paid service or signal and you can quickly talk to others after pushing a button. They are easy to use and reliable as long as the battery is charged and there is someone at the other end who is listening.

You can improve the reception from a walkie-talkie if you know the surrounding topography and can transmit from a higher location. Buy a pack of two walkie-talkies or expand to a larger set if you have family members that don’t live in the same home but are near enough within the 30-mile range.

Walkie-talkies are powered by batteries that can be charged using a base charger. However, when the power grid goes down, you need a solar power charging option to keep the units charged.

Low-tech comms options

When the use of any kind of modern technology isn’t an option, these low-tech options can be used to communicate with others.

Fire and smoke

Fires are a low-tech form of communication, but it is a basic way of showing others where you are. When SHTF, you can use fire and smoke to show others nearby your current location.

Signal mirror

A signal mirror or any object with a shiny surface that can be used to bounce sunlight may be useful in an emergency.

A signal mirror is small and can be used to alert others about your location when you can’t use sound or the power grid. While you need sunlight to work a signal mirror properly, you can still reach others even if the sun isn’t too bright.

Signal mirrors can also be used to start a fire by bouncing the sun’s rays to a specific point.

A whistle can be used to signal others if you are outdoors and need to be rescued. If you are going camping or hiking, make sure you always have a whistle on your bag as an emergency communication tool.

Whistles can usually be heard up to a half mile away.

Written word

After SHTF, the written word is another low-tech option for communication worth considering. If you get separated from your family, leave them a note somewhere so you can keep in touch if you miss each other at your chosen meet-up area.

If you don’t have a pen and some paper, look for other ways to write like carving into a tree with a knife.

Before SHTF, make sure you can communicate with your family and friends by investing in reliable communication tools like a ham radio or a sat phone.

Visit SurvivalGear.news for more information about other useful tools.

Watch the video below about 10 basic SHTF gear for preppers.

This video is from the .

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